The Roasted Bone Marrow / Broth Experiment

This was my first time ever having Roasted Bone Marrow. Frankly, I had ZERO idea what to expect.

All I knew is I had to try it, because well, it’s allegedly the highest, bestest, supremest brain food that is available out there, it’s super nutrient dense, does absolutely awesome things for your body and yadi yadi ya. Plus, well, I had some in the freezer from my previous beef order. Now it was either me who was gonna get it, or the dogs.

I figured I owed it to myself to at least give it a try…

While doing a little bit of research on the subject, I happened to learn that, apparently, this would be Anthony Bourdain’s dish selection for his last and ultimate meal.

Uhm, I thought to myself. Surely, if a man deems this dish worthy of having as his final meal, then it has to be some kind of undervalued treasure, an exquisite delicacy of some sort. Or at the very least, a more than acceptable fare…

All that information was more than enough to convince me that I NEEDED not only to try bone marrow, but I needed to LIKE IT.  

And so began the great Roasted Bone Marrow experiment…

Marrow Bone | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

It is said that one should try and select bones that are fairly large with big thick tubes of marrow. And they shouldn’t be too tall either, because then it would make it really hard to get all of that precious marrow out.

Of course, one could always get their butcher to slice them in half for them. Or one could also get the long, narrow bones that usually come pre-sliced.

Marrow Bone | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

Sprinkle the bones generously on both sides with salt and pepper and set them on a baking sheet. Some fat will leak out during cooking, so make sure that your baking sheet has a little bit of a rim to it ‘cuz you wouldn’t want to lose a drop of that precious fat!

That, or, you wouldn’t want it to end up at the bottom of your oven, now would you?

Roasted Bone Marrow | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

The bones need to roast at a fairly high temperature, for about 10-15 minutes, depending on thickness.

You want to take them out of the oven when they get nicely crispy and golden and the marrow becomes soft and starts to bubble a little bit. Be careful not to overdo the cooking, or your marrow will end up completely melted down. The marrow, when done roasting, should be enjoyably warm but not exactly hot.

Roasted Bone Marrow | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

Looks like it’s ready… let’s dig in! THIS, is what Roasted Bone Marrow looks like.

It has a soft, slightly gelatinous, fatty, creamy texture… uhmmmm, my fork seems happy, but my mouth is really not sure.

I can’t say that I was really looking forward to tasting it, but hey, after I’d gotten this far, I wasn’t about to back out.

So I took the fork to my mouth. Hmpft. It has a soft, slightly gelatinous, fatty, creamy texture… and a taste that I really couldn’t describe. Seriously. I cannot find a single word.

All I know is, I’m not a fan… yet!

Still, I tried another bite but that was the end of this experiment for me. Oh, I’m not saying that I’m totally giving up on the idea of eating / liking bone marrow. I’m saying that it’s probably an acquired taste. One that I WILL acquire. Only not today.

For the time being, we will be putting these bones to good use and still benefit from all of the marrow’s super powers by turning it into a luscious broth.

Oh, but by all means, if YOU have acquired the taste already and enjoy eating Roasted Bone Marrow, do yourself a favor and go to town before you go through with the following steps!

Roasted Bone Marrow Broth | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

Dump all of your Roasted Bones into a large saucepan or stockpot. Don’t forget all the precious fat that’s at the bottom of your baking sheet!

That’s liquid gold for ya… and flavor galore right there!

Roasted Bone Marrow Broth | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

Throw in the rest of the ingredients, namely salt, pepper, pickling spice, a carrot that you’ve broken into 2 or 3 pieces, a celery rib which has been given the same treatment, an onion, skin and all, cut into quarters, a few cloves of garlic and a handful of [not so fresh anymore as you can see] parsley

Oh, and 8 cups of water, too!

Roasted Bone Marrow Broth | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

After 60 to 90 minutes of simmering time, you will want to strain your stock through a fine mesh sieve, then let it sit for a few minutes, just to make sure that you get every last drop of stock out of this.

Notice how all the marrow has disappeared, leaving nothing but a gaping hole in the center of that bone? That’s a good thing. It means that it’s now IN your broth.

Roasted Bone Marrow Broth | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

Now for the taste test…

It smells fantastic, I can already tell you that much. But let’s pour ourselves a nice cup of that delightful warm broth.

Now THAT, I like! It has a bold yet very mild and even delicate flavor to it, if that’s even possible… and in the mouth, it really feels super smooth and silky. This will be a very good way for me to make friends with the flavor of Roasted Bone Marrow.

Then we’ll start working on texture. And in the event that texture and I never see eye to eye, at least I know I have this alternative that I can resort to.

Roasted Bone Marrow Broth | by Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

Served with a few pieces of Home Made Beef Jerky, this broth makes for a delightful, tasty and satisfying mid-afternoon snack.

But of course, you can very well use that broth in your favorite soups and various recipes. On that idea, I am completely sold. From now on, I can guarantee that I will choose Bone Broth over Chicken Stock any day. Without so much as a moment’s hesitation!

Although someday, hopefully, that Marrow will be long gone before the bones make it to the stockpot. 

Roasted Bone Marrow / Broth

Yield: Yelds about 4 cups

Roasted Bone Marrow / Broth

INGREDIENTS

    For the Roasted Bone Marrow
  • 1lb grassfed beef marrow bones
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • For the Bone Broth
  • 8 cups water
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns
  • 1 tsp pickling spice
  • 1/2 tsp Himalayan salt
  • 1 large carrot, broken into 2-3 pieces
  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed
  • 1 onion, cut into large chunks
  • 1 celery rib, broken into 2-3 pieces
  • a handful fresh parsley

INSTRUCTIONS

    To make the Roasted Bone Marrow
  1. Preheat the oven to 425F
  2. Place the marrow bones on a baking sheet and sprinkle liberally with salt and pepper (on both sides, please!)
  3. Roast bones in the oven for about 10-15 minutes, until they turn golden and marrow becomes soft and just barely starts to melt. You want to take them out of the oven when they get nicely crispy and golden and the marrow becomes soft and starts to bubble a little bit. Be careful not to overdo the cooking, or your marrow will end up completely melted down. The marrow, when done, should be enjoyably warm but not exactly hot.
  4. Remove to a plate and serve with a side of fresh leafy greens, or continue with broth making
  5. To make the broth
  6. Add the roasted bones along with all the rest of the ingredients to a large saucepan or stockpot.
  7. Bring to a roaring oil then lower heat, partly cover and simmer for 1 to 1½ hours, until the flavor of the broth is to your liking.
  8. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and serve, or use in your favorite soups/recipes.
http://thehealthyfoodie.com/roasted-bone-marrow-broth/

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Comments

    • says

      Ah, but you need to at least taste the marrow before you throw it in the stock. You can train your brain to like anything, you know. At least, that’s what I think… And what’s the marrow done to you to deserve you turning your back on it like that, without even giving it a chance? Don’t take my word for it, you might like it so much you’ll want to roll yourself in it! ;)

      • says

        But I’ve tried bone marrow before with risotto Milanese. Basically it’s saffron risotto with a roasted bone marrow on top, and I didn’t enjoy, at all.
        If that’s OK with you, I’ll stick to broth! :)

  1. Andrea Campbell says

    Sonia — I LOVED eating the DELICIOUS bone marrow out the the soup bones my mother prepared. I remember asking, “What’s that?” and having her say, “It’s the marrow. It’s delicious and it’s good for you. Eat it” It didn’t look very good, but of course it was! Fast forward to my adult life, and I’ve done of lot of great cooking, but unfortunately, I haven’t used bones the way she did.

    But I’m going to now!! Thanks for a post that is at once helpful and a blast from the past!

  2. Andy says

    The restaurant Ox in Portland has a clam chowder to die for. On the menu it is listed as:
    Fresh Clam Chowder, Smoked Marrow Bone, Scallion, Jalapeño
    A 5-6 inch bone cut lengthwise garnishes the bowl. We were a little skeptical at first but after one taste, all of us at the table were scraping out that marrow… we were practically like a pack of dogs fighting over a bone! It was perfect with the soup and the soup was incredible. AND everything else that came to the table was amazing as well. Now I think I will make some soup and use your recipe to get started. Thanks!

    • says

      Smoked Bone Marrow… now I really LOVE the sound of that. I really need to give it a try, as soon as I get to use my outdoor grill again!

      That soup sure sounds delicious too. I think I too will use it as inspiration. Thanks for that, Andy! :)

  3. Joann says

    Great recipe I cannot wait to try it. Don’t forget to add 1 – 2 Tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to the broth while simmering. This help to draw more nutrients from the bones.

  4. Koby Laffer says

    Looks so delicious. I must try this one. Family would also love to taste this recipe. Thanks for sharing.

  5. Melinda says

    Sonia, I used this post to make my own bone broth. I make my own stock, beef and chicken, as the first step in my two day soup recipes. Roasting the bones first was a new step for me, not a lengthy or difficult step; I found the flavor much different from the non-roasted-meat-only version I’ve been using. I really like the bone broth better! And! Bones are very inexpensive! Interestingly, one of the recipes I looked at said that the bones would become soft and “fall apart”. That did not happen in my stock pot. It looks like the bones you used remained intact as well. I just wasn’t ready to have it simmer for days to achieve that state. I’ll stick to your method! Thanks for this post, it has added a level of flavor I will enjoy in my already pretty darned good soups.

    • says

      Well, theoretically, from what I read, bone broth is supposed to simmer for 24 to 48 hours in order to get all the nutritional benefits from the marrow. I suppose that after all that time, the bones are probably a lot softer. Guess I’ll have to try it someday, but if I do that, I’ll have to do it in the slow cooker or oven. No way I’m leaving an open flame unsupervised while I sleep or am away.

      I will, however, always roast the bones prior to making the broth. It does add a lot of flavor, doesn’t it? :)

  6. Danielle says

    I LOVE bone marrow and I actually am making broth right now! If the texture bothers you, try it on some toast points. Also, grab some light greens like arugula, parsley, etc and lightly dress them with lemon juice…put that on your toast point along with the marrow (spread it like you’re spreading butter on toast). This is how I got one of my friends to love bone marrow on the first try. Yummmm!!

  7. Ann says

    Thank you for the recipe. My 15 yr old daughter would have eaten all the marrow if I’d let her, but I wanted to try the stock recipe also. Guess we will be getting more marrow bones… :-)

  8. cindi says

    Ok…i remember as a child my grandmother sucking the marrow from the chicken bones. At the time I’m thinking gross! Who would want to eat that???

    Forty or so years later here i am suffering from arthritis. I found an article saying how wonderful bone marrow is for the body. I made a small pot but was afraid to eat the fat that rose to the top. I skimmed it off. Did i ruine the benefits of the stock?
    Is eating the fat healthy?

    Waiting for your reply and thank you for the answers in advance.
    Cindi :)

    • says

      According to what I read, Cindi, to reap the full benefits of bone broth you must one, use bones from well sourced animals (i.e. grassfed, pastured), let your broth simmer for at least 24 hours (longer is even better) and add a few tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to it, which helps in extracting all the precious nutrients from the bones and marrow. When refrigerated, a successful bone broth should become “gelified” and a nice coat of fat should form at the top. Of course, you shouldn’t remove that. If your bones come from well sourced animals, that layer of fat is super healthy indeed.

      Now if you don’t do ALL of the above, you don’t necessarily ruin the benefits of the stock. You just don’t get the FULL benefits, that’s all. In the end, I guess you’re better off getting some of the benefits than none at all! :)

  9. cindi says

    Thank you Sonia. :)

    Wow! It was quite simple to make. Ill ask the butcher next time (whether grass fed or what ever) and make another batch. This time I’ll use fat and all!

    Thanks for your quick reply Sonia!

    Cindi :-)

  10. Charisse says

    Thanks for this wonderful recipe. I love bone marrow soup and roasted bone marrow. The key to eating bone marrow is you have to eat it with rice or potatoes, it’s super tasty that way and you don’t feel that gelatinous thing lol.

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