Think making your own bread at home is too much hard work? Think again! This Multigrain No Knead Country Bread is every bit as easy to make as it is good to eat!

Think making your own bread at home is too much hard work? Think again! This Multigrain No Knead Country Bread is every bit as easy to make as it is good to eat!

I don’t tend to eat much bread, but when I do get the craving for a slice, I like to make my own bread in the comfort of my very own home. For starters, because nothing quite beats a slice of warm, fresh-out-of-the-oven bread, and well, it makes the whole house smell incredibly good! But also too because that way, I get to know exactly what goes into it. And plus, well, contrary to what you may think, making bread at home can be EXTREMELY easy, and practically foolproof, too.

Take this Multigrain No Knead Country Bread for instance. While you do have to plan ahead if you’re going to make it, as it needs to rest and rise for a full day before you get to actually bake it, it’s as easy to make as mixing flour and water together in a bowl. Yes, really. That easy!

Don’t believe me? Please, allow me to demonstrate…

Flours and grains in a blue mixing bowl being mixed with a whisk

First, you’re going to use a combination of 3 different kinds of flour: 1 cup of unbleached all purpose flour, 1 cup of whole wheat flour, and 1 cup of multigrain flour.

Multigrain flour will often be called 5 grain, 6 grain, 10 grain, 12 grain, etc. It doesn’t really matter which one you choose, so long as it’s multigrain! And if you can’t find multigrain, don’t sweat it. Simply substitute more whole wheat flour for it. 

To that, you’re going to add some actual grains, namely 1/4 cup oat groats, 1/4 cup flax seeds, 1/4 cup bulgur wheat and 1/4 cup sunflower seeds.

Again, if you can’t find those specific grains and seeds, feel free to substitute any other kind. Steel cut oats, buckwheat groats, poppy seeds, chia seeds, millet, amaranth; those are all great substitutions that come to mind. Just be sure to choose grains or seeds that you can safely chew on in their raw state, without risking breaking a tooth; rice or barley, for instance, might not be your best options… 

Finally, you’ll need to throw in 1 teaspoon of active dry yeast. Please, be sure that your active yeast is actually still active! If you’re in doubt, test it first; it should say on the package how to do that…

All that goes into a large bowl and gets mixed with a whisk until thoroughly combined.

Water is being poured from a glass measuring cup into a blue bowl containing flours

Now that everything’s been mixed together, add the warm water.

The only rule here is to make sure that your water isn’t too hot, which could kill your yeast. Slightly warmer than your body temperature is the way to go!

A sticky wet ball of whole grain bread dough in a blue mixing bowl with a wooden spoon sticking out of it

Stir until a wet dough forms and all the flour has been incorporated, about 45 seconds.

Multigrain Bread Dough in a blue bowl after it has risen for 24 hours

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place it in a warm place to rest for 18 to 24 hours. How long to let the dough rest is not an exact science, it depends more on your schedule… go for a minimum of 18 hours, and a maximum of 24, how’s that?

The real important thing to look for is that your dough must have more than doubled in size and become sort of spongy.

Multigrain bread dough in a blue bowl being mixed with tips of fingers

Now you must “punch” the dough, in other words, you have to deflate it. Do that by poking and folding it with the tip of your fingers; the dough will be sticky, that’s completely normal, and desirable! 

Multigrain bread dough in a standard loaf pan

Transfer the dough to a loaf pan and delicately spread it evenly across the pan with your fingers.

Cover the pan loosely with plastic film and place it in a warm place to let the dough rise once more, about 3 hours this time.

Again, this is not an exact science: the dough needs to pretty much double in size. Aim for 3 hours, but anywhere from 2 to 4 would work just fine. Also, the warmer the environment, the faster the dough will rise. If you’re in a pinch, place the pan in the cold oven and turn the oven light on. This will definitely speed things up for you! 

Multigrain bread dough in a standard loaf pan after it has risen for 3 hours, brushed with avocado oil and getting sprinkled with a handful of seeds and grains

When you are ready to bake your bread, preheat your oven to 400°F; brush the top of your loaf with a little bit of avocado oil and sprinkle with a handful of assorted seeds and grains, if desired.

Multigrain No Knead Country Bread fresh out of the oven, cooling in the pan

Bake the bread for 40 to 45 minutes or until the top is golden brown and the crust appears crispy;

Multigrain No Knead Country Bread fresh out of the oven, sliced

Let the bread cool in the pan for a few minutes then take it out of the pan and let it cool on a wire rack for about 30 minutes before slicing and indulging!

Can you get a sense of how chewy and dense yet airy that bread is? And how crazy crispy that crust is? I’m telling you, make this bread once and you’ll want to make it time and time again…

Think making your own bread at home is too much hard work? Think again! This Multigrain No Knead Country Bread is every bit as easy to make as it is good to eat!

Multigrain No Knead Country Bread

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes
Think making your own bread at home is too much hard work? Think again! This Multigrain No Knead Country Bread is every bit as easy to make as it is good to eat!
Servings: 16 slices

Ingredients

Optional Garnish

Instructions

  • Combine the dry ingredients, including the active yeast, in a large bowl and mix with a whisk until thoroughly combined.
  • Add the warm water and stir until a wet dough forms and all the flour has been incorporated, about 45 seconds.
  • Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place it in a warm place to rest for 18 to 24 hours.
  • Deflate the dough -it will be sticky, that's normal- by poking and folding it with your fingers and then transfer it to a loaf pan, delicately spreading it evenly across the pan with your fingers.
  • Cover the pan loosely with plastic film and place it in a warm place to let the dough rise once more, about 3 hours this time.
  • When ready to bake your bread, preheat the oven to 400°F; brush the top of your loaf with a little bit of avocado oil and sprinkle with a handful of seeds and grains, if desired.
  • Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until the top is golden brown and the crust appears crispy.
  • Let the bread cool in the pan for a few minutes then take it out of the pan and let it cool on a wire rack for about 30 minutes before slicing.
  • Store leftovers in a cool dry place for up to a few days.

Notes

Prep time does not include resting periods of 18 to 24 hours and 3 hours.

Nutrition

Calories: 118kcal, Carbohydrates: 20g, Protein: 4g, Fat: 2g, Sodium: 147mg, Potassium: 113mg, Fiber: 3g, Calcium: 16mg, Iron: 1.3mg
Course: Bakery
Cuisine: American
Author: Sonia! The Healthy Foodie

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